Technology will improve future well-being (it is believed by many)

Brits are embracing the future with 60% thinking that technology will improve their future wellbeing. Almost half back further research into DNA sequencing and editing, while over a third of Londoners say they would be microchipped!
European neighbours are less optimistic about future tech with the French believing it will lead to unemployment, while Spaniards worry it will lead to breakdown of trust.

New research shows the UK public are ready to welcome future tech into many areas of their lives, with 60% saying they expect technology will improve their future wellbeing; 77% say that healthcare should be the focus of technological advancement – that’s almost double those who think it should be space exploration (29%). Yet despite the UK public’s enthusiasm for technology, the research did reveal some misgivings. More than half of Brits (53%) worry that people will become more and more isolated and only 28% expect technology to have a positive impact on levels of employment. Overall, just over one-fifth (22%) of people said that they were optimistic about the future.

Across Europe, research shows people are even more sceptical about how technology will affect their lives. Around a third (31%) of Spanish people believe that technology will mean the breakdown of trust in society; over half (52%) of French think that it will have a negative impact on employment, and a third consider robotics to be a threat. Meanwhile, only 13% of German people were likely to say they would replace meals with pills or pick a love match based on DNA or pheromone compatibility.

ComRes interviewed 1,002 UK adults, 1,004 French adults, 1,001 German adults, 1,000 Spanish adults in April 2016. The research was commissioned by Nesta, the UK’s innovation foundation.

www.nesta.org.uk

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